Monday, July 27, 2015

Grund Organic Cotton Rug Give Away!

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Grund Organic Rugs has generously gifted Sarah Barnard Design with a organic cotton rug from their Puro collection. One lucky blog subscriber will win this FREE 21" x 34" rug in white. This gorgeous rug has luxurious soft texture and a subtle woven border around the edges.



All current blog subscribers are eligible to win, just click on the subscribe buttons at the top right of this screen, or enter your email in the "subscribe by email" field. A winner will be selected at random on Wednesday August 19th.

Information from the manufacturer: Grund® Organics rugs are made of 100% cotton from certified biological cultivation. Our Organic Cotton is a safe, socially responsible and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional cotton. It provides the same benefits of conventional cotton, soft, durable, affordable-but without the negative effects to the environment and to human exposure to harmful chemicals.Our Organic Cotton Home Rugs are certified by GOTS, which is the worldwide leading textile processing standard lab. The Grund® Organic Cotton Home Rugs can be used in many rooms in the home, including the bathroom, kitchen, laundry room, and utility rooms.

Grund® Organic Cotton Rugs are available online at Amazon, Bed Bath & Beyond, and Wayfair

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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

 Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.

San Vicente Courtyards Walking Tour

Sunday, August 9 from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm

The Santa Monica Conservancy, in collaboration with the Historic San Vicente Coalition, will host free, guided walking tours of historic courtyard housing on San Vicente Boulevard, stretching from Ocean Avenue to Seventh Street on Sunday, August 9 at 11 am, 11:30 am and noon. Tours last about 1.5-2 hours.

 

Photo credit Douglas Brian Martin for the Historic San Vicente Coalition.

This corridor of courtyard housing was recently nominated for designation as a historic district by the city’s Landmark Commission with support from a number of local organizations and courtyard residents who are working to retain the architecture and character of this unique neighborhood. If designated, this district will become the third in Santa Monica.

 

Photo credit Douglas Brian Martin for the Historic San Vicente Coalition. 

Courtyard housing is unique to Southern California. This corridor contains the most significant and cohesive concentration of courtyard buildings in Santa Monica, creating a distinctive neighborhood of architecturally noteworthy buildings built between 1937 and 1953. The buildings are two-and-three stories, configured around a landscaped open space, and designed in various architectural styles such as Streamline Moderne, American Colonial Revival, and Mid-Century Modern. This tour will provide an opportunity to learn more about Santa Monica’s courtyards and the distinctive character of the San Vicente corridor.          

The tours will begin at the northeast corner of San Vicente Boulevard and 4th Street. Advance reservations are required and can be made here

 

Telephone Number: (310) 496-3146

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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

 Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the
Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.





Thursday, May 28, 2015

Designing Hope: The How & Why of Keeping the Joy in Pro Bono


Click on any image to enlarge
 













 To download the PDF of this article click here

SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

 Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the
Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.



Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Designing a Safe Space for an Autistic Child

By: Jacqueline Salgado

Designing a calm environment for children with autism can seem like a daunting task. Even though every child is different and may react differently to certain environments, there are five key design points to consider in order to successfully achieve a calm and structured space.
 

Photo Courtesy of: Elaine Richardson, Architect

Layout

When designing the child’s room, consider the layout.

To begin, consider the scale of the room. What do you want to integrate in the room? Once you have made a list, take it from there.

One way to successfully choose what you want to integrate in the room is knowing your child’s needs, and paying close attention to how your child responds to an environment. How do you want your child to navigate through the space?

Start the layout by placing the furniture on the sides of the room and leaving the middle open to navigate. This layout is not only simple, but easy for the child to move around the room.  When placing the furniture on the sides, the child is able to easily access things he/she needs within the room, creating a form of independence within.
 
Acousticalsolutions.com

 
Noise

Noise is another aspect of designing a room that is often forgotten about, but essential when designing a space for a person with autism. Children with autism are sensitive to loud noises, and thereby cannot filter them out as easily as other people can. This not only raises anxiety levels, but can affect the way the child behaves on a daily basis. This being said, there are simple ways to prevent background noise from filtering in.

One easy way to start is by focusing on all the background noise. What background noises can you easily hear from the room that may cause discomfort to your child? When you have pinpointed the main triggers, take it from there.

Keep the background noise out by integrating small fixes. Try applying a wall that has acoustic panels. This not only brings down the noise, but it can be used as a discrete and functional decorative element.
 
If the first option is not something that would be convenient, another way to bring the noise down would be to replace any hard wood flooring with carpet. Not only is carpet recommended for children with autism because it reduces the chance of the child getting hurt and keeps the light from reflecting, but also because carpet keeps the noise from echoing throughout the room.

 
Lighting

Lighting can have a strong affect on someone’s mood. Just as we can be affected by specific lighting, children with autism are hyper sensitive to it, therefore specific lighting should be considered when integrating fixtures.

One thing to stay away from is fluorescent lighting. Fluorescent lighting is known to flicker and depending on the wattage and lamp type, it can be extremely bright. The flickering is not only distracting, but it is known to cause eye strains, headaches, and migraines. This type of lighting affects the child with hypersensitivity.

One way to easily fix this is by changing the lamp. Opt for a fixture with diffused lighting or a fixture with adjustable settings. Being able to dim the light can make a difference for someone’s mood.

 










Jeri Koegel Photography


Color

Color selections can seem overwhelming with the millions of options out there. Therefore, choosing the right color for the room is an essential step. Important colors to consider are light neutral colors. Just as bright lights can affect the mood of the child in a negative way, certain colors can have similar effects.  Colors to stay away from are bold and dark. Although primary colors tend to be the norm when choosing room colors for children, it is not the case when choosing a room color for a child with autism. Bold colors are allowed in small accents, such as their toys. In addition to bold colors, wallpapers with busy patterns or stripes can be distracting for the child. It is best to stay with paint colors that are not only low in VOC, but that are not hazardous to the child.
 
Privacy

Reports have shown how important and essential Sensory Rooms/ spaces are for kids with Autism. These spaces allow children to get away and be a place where they can relax and feel safe. There are certain things that can be integrated into a sensory room in order for the child to feel better. As stated previously, layouts are important. If the room is big enough, a corner can be reserved specifically to be the “Sensory Room.” It can easily be done by separating the space with a dark curtain, or having a completely separate room specifically for it.

The primary focus is to make a place the child can feel comfortable and stress free. Items such as a bean bag, or a sensory pea pod sold by Autism-products.com can help a child feel comfortable and safe.
 
 

Designing a room for anyone can be successfully achieved just as long as the person’s needs are discussed and integrated. Designing a room for children with autism can be seem challenging, but  as long as the child’s needs and primary focus are known, changes can be made in order to make it possible.

 

Cited Sites:


http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2014/10/28/course-interior-design/19795/



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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the
Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.

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Jacqueline Salgado is an interior designer who holds a Bachelor Of Science Interior Design Degree from California State University Northridge. She is a member of ASID and primarily focuses on commercial design. Her favorite style is contemporary design, but loves to experiment with different styles.
 
In her free time Jacqueline likes to travel, hike, and visit museums. Her love for the outdoors and nature is what inspires and motivates her to practice environmental design. 
 
 

 
 
 
 

  
 

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

In With the Old

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The latest edition of Art and Home is here! From a 19th-century farmhouse in the Hamptons to a 1930s Paris mansion, five historic homes blend tradition with modern updates, finds Iyna Bort Caruso.
IMG_9339Art & Home—June/July 2015
Call it the surprise inside: historic residences retrofitted with modern interiors.
Homeowners may love the idea of properties that embrace the aesthetics of an earlier era, but they’re drawing the line at living a century-old lifestyle. Instead of tearing down, however, they’re taking up the challenge. They’re purging boxy rooms, awkward layouts and tiny closets and arriving at that sweet spot where the age of grace meets the age of technology.
 
In America, homes of historic value are generally pegged at 50 years or older by the National Register of Historic Places, although those are relative newcomers by international standards. It takes the skills of true artisans to modernize a centuries-old German castle, French ch√Ęteau, English manor or Italian villa, and many governments offer homeowners subsidies for their efforts.
More than just age, historic homes embody the spirit of the times in which they were built with character-defining features that speak to who we were and how we lived.
 
“There’s an emotional connection to be had, for sure,” says Judson Henderson of Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty in Princeton, NJ. The earliest homes here date back to the 18th century. Some homeowners bring “today’s practicality and sensitivity to home renovations” while others go for a gut renovation. “Walk through the door and it’s starkly modern. You feel like you’re in a brand new house,” Henderson says.
 
Most makeovers are somewhere in between, using architectural elements as jumping-off points to maintain some sense of authenticity.
Interior Designer Sarah Barnard in Santa Monica, Calif., is a specialist in historic home design. In reshaping Victorian, Spanish Revival and Arts and Craft estates, she often takes a hybrid approach, “preserving a lot of the original architectural elements and melding them with uber contemporary strategies.”
 
Deciding which of those elements to keep or discard can be a struggle. Is it worth sacrificing what Barnard calls the “heartwarming little details that made the owner’s heart sing in the initial walk-through” for the larger benefits of functionality and design?  “There are always hard decisions to be made but when budget is not an issue, rehabilitating the old is always my first choice.”
People may yearn for vintage homes for different reasons, but one thing they have in common is “kindness,” observes Barnard. “You have to have a sympathetic soul to want to save an old building.”
Miami$2,995,000  USD | Miami Beach, Florida | ONE Sotheby’s International Realty
Behind the Mediterranean facade and inviting courtyard, modern luxury meets the classic beauty of this 1929 home. Property features an open floor plan, added interior space, floating stairwell, Pecky Cypress vaulted ceiling, fireplace, charming/restored Cuban tile and hardwood flooring.
Hamptons$7,995,000 USD | Sagaponack, New York | Sotheby’s International Realty – East Hampton Brokerage
Once the home of James Jones, author of “From Here to Eternity”, this 1860s Sagaponack farmhouse was built to capture the sunsets from one of the highest points south of the Montauk highway. Today the house has been renovated and merges the intimate spaces of a traditional home with the open, naturally lit spaces of a modern SOHO loft. In addition, this home incorporated the Crestron computer network, clean conscious building techniques and materials, active solar power, and geothermal heating and cooling to create one of the most advanced, healthy and sustainable homes in the Hamptons.
Princeton$7,900,000 USD |Princeton, New Jersey | Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty
Stunningly transformed “Everlasting” rivals the toniest East Coast estates, yet is privately situated on 12 acres in Princeton. Under the eye of architect/designer Michael La Rocca, skilled artisans used materials of the highest caliber to expand, open and visually elevate the brick manor house and its grounds. The sleek central kitchen was cleverly planned with double islands to serve a single chef or a team of caterers.
Canada4 495 000$ CAD | Toronto, Canada | Sotheby’s International Realty Canada
Built in the early 1900’s, this spectacular and spacious home has been fully renovated with modern amenities and architectural elements including a high ceilinged study, and breathtaking 2 story glass-walled Great Room overlooking the verdant ravine lot and in ground pool and spa.
France33.000.000 € EUR | Paris, France | Paris Ouest Sotheby’s International Realty
This magnificent, ultra-rare historic Paris mansion dating from the 1930s has recently undergone a complete renovation and now offers sleek open spaces with a contemporary edge whilst at the same time carefully preserving its architectural heritage.
New York-based writer Iyna Bort Caruso has contributed to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Newsday, among others.
Discover much more in the Art and Home digital edition now on iPad and Android!
iPad - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/art-home/id962145331
Android - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sothebysrealty.arthomeandroid
 
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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.

Monday, May 4, 2015

How Scared Should You Be of Off-Gassing?

by  

How Scared Should You Be of Off-Gassing?
Maybe you’ve heard of off-gassing, with headlines claiming a mattress or couch slowly ruined someone’s health. Maybe you shrugged it off. Who has time to worry about their couch? Maybe off-gassing just hasn’t made it into your dinner table conversation yet. In any case, it’s time to pay attention.
When it comes to the chemicals used to manufacture common household goods, there’s a whole lot we don’t know. These chemicals don’t just stay in products. Many of them enter the air via a process called off-gassing; they are then ingested by the people and animals who use them. Thus far, these chemical contaminants have been linked to around 180 human diseases and health conditions.
But don’t sell your house just yet. A little education—understanding what products contain harmful chemicals and how to reduce your exposure—is a powerful thing. It can help you make your home a healthier place for years to come. Read on for the low-down.

What is Off-Gassing? 

Off-gassing (also known as out-gassing) refers to the release of airborne particulates or chemicals—dubbed volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—from common household products. Potential sources of off-gassing range from construction materials to carpeting, cabinetry, furniture, paint, and any number of household goods. Some of the most common chemicals off-gassed from household items include formaldehyde, benzene, ammonia, and toluene. While off-gassing can be easily identified by so-called “new car” and “new carpet” smells, it can also be odorless.
Sound scary? Unfortunately, we’re just getting started. More than 80,000 chemicals have been introduced into the environment in the last 50 years, and the majority of them haven’t been studied for their effects on people or animals. But that hasn’t stopped manufacturers from incorporating these chemicals into their production processes.
While the effects of off-gassing are still being studied, what we do know is that many of the chemicals can cause allergic reactions and other health problems—including congestion, coughing, skin irritation, asthma attacks, and fatigue, as well as leukemia, lymphomas, or cognitive decline. Health effects depend on the particular chemical(s) involved, the concentration of VOCs in the home, and how long and how often a person is exposed.
Look around your home: You’re all but guaranteed to find any number of VOC-emitting items. Some of the most common sources of off-gassing include:
Furniture: Mattresses, couches, chairs, and other furniture are all common sources of VOCs.
Carpets: That “new carpet smell” is not a good thing. Carpets can emit VOCs for five or more years (though off-gassing decreases after the first few months).
Electronics: Computers and their keyboards are common off-gassers. During the printing process, laser printers and photocopiers can release ozone, which can irritate the nose, lungs, and throat.
Particleboard and plywood: These materials are present in virtually any home, whether in construction materials or furniture. Unfortunately, the glue that holds them together almost always contains formaldehyde, a known carcinogen.
Household cleaners: Despite containing an enormous number of toxic contaminants and VOCs, the majority of cleaning products are not assessed for safety. Soaps, glass cleaners, toilet bowl cleaners, polishes, and detergents are all common sources of VOCs.
Dryer sheets: They may smell nice, but these sheets off-gas a whole host of chemicals. In fact, the Material Safety Data Sheet warns against dryer sheets, citing them as a cause of eye and skin irritation.
Nail polish remover: Your average bottle of nail polish remover likely contains acetone, a nasty and harmful chemical. Breathing acetone can cause issues ranging from irritation of the nose, throat, lungs, or eyes to headaches, nausea, and fatigue.
Other household goods: Toys, tennis balls, paints, wallpaper, adhesives, cabinetry, bedding, cars, varnishes, floor coverings, fireplaces, wood burning stoves, vinyl, plastics, cosmetics, air fresheners, moth balls, and newspapers all frequently off-gas harmful chemicals.

Where Do VOCs Lurk in Your Home

How to Reduce Exposure

While it can certainly take time and effort (and maybe some extra money), there are ways to limit your exposure to VOCs in the home.
Conduct a home inventory. Survey your own home to determine possible sources of VOCs. Whenever possible, safely dispose of them: Contact your local government or visit the Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) web site to learn how. If you have questions, consult a professional indoor air quality inspector.
Read the label. Choose no- or low-VOC products whenever possible. If a product isn’t clearly labeled, call the manufacturer. Check new furniture to see if any of the components are certified by GREENGUARD, Scientific Certification Systems, or SGS Group, three organizations that approve sustainable and low- or no-emitting products.
Purchase used products. Whether it’s an older home or a used couch, used products will have already undergone some of their highest off-gassing rates. If you can’t find a used product, try to purchase a floor model, which will have had some time to air out while outside of its packaging.
Circulate fresh air into the home. If possible, make sure your home has a heat recovery ventilator, your stove has an exhaust fan that vents to the outside, and every bathroom is equipped with a well-functioning exhaust fan. Another easy way to introduce fresh air? Open the windows for a few hours each day.
Enlist the manufacturer’s help. If you’re planning to purchase a product that’s likely to off-gas, call the manufacturer several weeks in advance and ask if it would be possible for them to open the product and allow it to sit in the warehouse (ideally in fresh air). Oftentimes, the worst of the off-gassing occurs in the first few days after a product has been opened.
Air things out. Whenever possible, remove the packaging of a new product and allow it to sit for several days (or even weeks) outside or in a garage.
Remove wall-to-wall carpeting. It’s one of the worst offenders when it comes to VOC emissions (not to mention it harbors mold and dust mites). Can’t give up carpet completely? Replace the wall-to-wall stuff with area rugs. If throw rugs don’t cut it, replace traditional wall-to-wall carpet with a natural fiber carpet such as wool. Ideally, choose carpeting that doesn’t use adhesives.
Choose a less-toxic mattress. If you can afford it, look for a chemical-free wool, organic cotton, or natural latex mattress. Choose an organic cotton or wool futon if you’re looking for a more budget-friendly option. At the very least, choose a used mattress, which will off-gas less than a new model. Also search for mattresses that are PBDE-free, and avoid versions made with polyurethane foam.
Choose solid wood furniture. It’s a better alternative than products made with particleboard. Your best option is to choose FSC- or SFI-certified products, which are required to meet certain standards for health and sustainability. In general, try to avoid furniture made with cheap plywood, and choose products that utilize non-toxic, water-based glues.
Use computers wisely. Aim to use computers in well-ventilated areas, and take frequent breaks away from the computer (ideally in fresh, outdoor air).
Use a dehumidifier. Many chemicals off-gas at greater rates in higher temperatures and humidity. Keep the humidity below 45 percent to help limit these emissions.
Follow manufacturer’s directions. For example, if a product’s label instructs you to wear a mask or to use it in a well-ventilated area, do so. Those warnings are there for a reason, and following usage directions can help reduce your exposure to harmful chemicals.
Avoid polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Often found in linoleum, upholstery, and shower curtains, there’s pretty much nothing redeemable about the health properties of this product. It’s one of the most commonly used plastics, so eliminating it from your home can be tough, but the effort is worth it if you’re looking to cut back on negative health effects.
Avoid flame retardants. This can be difficult feat when it comes to furniture (particularly couches and mattresses), but your health will be better. If you’re not sure whether a product contains flame retardants, call the manufacturer.
Choose unscented products. Most artificially scented products are full of VOCs. Whenever possible, opt for unscented versions.
Wait until summer (or spring). Paint, remodel, or purchase new furniture when the weather is warm. That way, you can leave the windows open.
16 Ways to Reduce VOCs Exposure

We admit it: Reducing exposure to off-gassing and VOCs can be daunting. But the incentive is huge. By taking the time and energy to limit VOC emissions in your home, you’ll be investing in your health for years to come.
If this article has you interested in greening your home furnishings, check out these pieces of craft furniture— http://www.custommade.com/gallery/custom-arts-and-crafts/
How Scared Should You Be of Off-Gassing?
 
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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.
 
 

 

 


 

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Transformation in the Historic District


Transformation in the Historic District

Sunday, May 3 from 1 pm - 5 pm

 

When Jim Bianco and Lisa Mead purchased their 1906 home on Third Street in 1997, they faced daunting challenges. The house had been subdivided up into smaller apartments, which defaced the front porch with an enclosure. The interior had been abused over decades of neglect. Deterioration and remodeling had claimed many original architectural features.What inspired them to tackle the restoration of this vintage house?

 

 photo credit Benjamin L. Ariff

The historic district ordinance put into place in 1990 guaranteed that their investment would be protected, becoming part of the group of preserved early nineteenth century bungalows on Third Street. Other new homeowners have been drawn to this neighborhood, reclaiming and restoring some of the oldest homes in Ocean Park.

Today the Third Street Historic District demonstrates how historic preservation can revitalize an area and also recapture the ambience of Santa Monica’s past.

Join us for the Third Street Neighborhood Historic District Tour on Sunday, May 3, between 1 and 5 PM to see this and other restored homes. The tour includes the interiors of 4 historic properties and a docent-guided walk through the district to see other examples of late 19th and early 20th century architecture.

Check-in for the tour will be at 2621 2nd Street.

Advance tickets are $30 for Conservancy members and $40 for nonmembers, and may be purchased online. Tickets purchased on tour day will be $35/$45. If purchasing by mail, send a check by April 28th with your ticket request and contact information (name, phone number and email address) to the Santa Monica Conservancy, P.O. Box 653, Santa Monica 90406.  (310) 496-3146

Become a Member of the Leadership Circle: We have created a new category of membership for those who are able to donate $1000/year or more to make an even greater impact on the work of the Conservancy. Members of the Leadership Circle will have additional benefits including an annual private reception in a historic home. Please consider becoming a founding member of this important community of Conservancy supporters. 


Thank you! Together we will protect Santa Monica's historic places for generations to come.

 
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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.
 
 

 

 







Monday, April 13, 2015

Getting the Look for Less!

click on the images to enlarge interior
 

 
SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.
 

Friday, March 13, 2015

The Future of Kitchen Design Technology


Technology advances in luxury kitchen design promote better health, save time and reduce environmental impact. These developments in technology affect the way kitchens are being designed as well as the appliances that are selected for these designs. “Smart appliances,” which have abilities like Pandora streaming, hands-free faucets and the beginnings of virtual grocery shopping are already in existence. As these designs continue to evolve, kitchen design will become increasingly more important. This evolution of the kitchen will not only simplify everyday tasks, but also improve the way we manage health concerns and environmental responsibility. As urbanization increases, the traditional purpose of the kitchen is changing as homeowners feel they have less time to spend on conventional activities. Luxury kitchens are the first to see some of these developments in design technology.



Many advances in appliance technology are already underway. Top of the line kitchens are becoming very inventive in appearance while concerns about health have recently been at the top of the list of priorities among Americans. Kitchen design is adapting to meet consumer demand resulting in exciting changes to the way we inhabit our homes in a healthy manner. A common problem for many Americans is dehydration. Many people are actually unaware of how dehydrated they are on a daily basis, which can lead to other health problems later in life. Hydration censored faucets are in the beginning stages of design and will allow for the consumer to know how hydrated or dehydrated they are by simply placing a finger onto a censored touch screen at the top of the faucet. Censors that interpret dehydration will also be able to test vitamin levels of the body in the same way. 


Kitchens of the future will incorporate a new technology that works as a medical dispenser, reading vitals and dispensing the necessary vitamins and nutrients accordingly. With a similar type of censor, a concept product called “Nutrima” is a new technology that is intended to be able to tell you how fresh your food is and test its nutritional value. This device, which is similar to a tablet in size and design, can be installed in the kitchen. Place a food product on the sensor and nutritional value, weight, and freshness can all be measured at once.  A similar system by Whirlpool will also have social capabilities so the freshness and nutritional value of the food may be shared to other consumers. As homeowners become more aware and concerned with health responsibility, these concerns also seem to carry over in environmental responsibility as well.





It is no secret that our society has been ignorant to the negative environmental footprint we have been leaving for decades. Because of increasing concerns with sustainability, kitchen design concepts are evolving to better support sustainable ideals. “Working kitchen,” is a term that has formerly been used to refer to a kitchen layout that places appliances in a way that allows the consumer to accomplish tasks in the kitchen most efficiently, usually referring to the placement of the refrigerator, stove and sink. This term is now being redefined as we become a society with less time to do laborious chores. “Working kitchens” of the future will soon be understood as kitchens that have the energy of one appliance recycled to produce energy for another. For example, a refrigerator that runs nonstop throughout the day and night can create the energy needed to heat the water for a dishwasher. 


This imagined kitchen would soon become a reality as concept designs become tangible. In addition to recycling energy, it is also possible to recycle water in a similar manner. A new type of disposal design by GE Appliances is currently in its beginning stages and incorporates a sink that recycles waste water and redirects this water to a home garden. The same sink will also be capable of turning food waste into compost pellets, which can then be used to fertilize a home garden. Another strategy for reusing water use incorporates an in-sink dishwasher; smaller loads of dishes will be washed in minutes, using less water and less energy than traditional dishwashers. From a design perspective, combining many of these useful technologies conserves resources while maintaining a luxurious and minimalist aesthetic.





As appliances change and evolve, the overall aesthetic look of kitchens will change also. Sleeker designs made with environmentally responsible materials are becoming increasingly popular. The environmental impact of these materials is being investigated more than ever before. Paperstone is one example of a material such as this. By fusing together recycled paper, the matter becomes dense and heat resistant. This material may potentially be used for counter tops, appliances, walls and even furniture. Icestone, which also uses recycled materials, is a synthetic mixture of concrete and recycled glass, creating a decorative yet environmentally friendly design option. Cork and rubber are also becoming increasingly prevalent materials used to kitchen design and are sophisticated as well as practical. These progressive materials are being paired with new technology and smart design strategies to create kitchen spaces that are not only visually appealing but also functional and responsible.

Good interior design is never only about the visual appearance of the space. It has become the responsibility of the manufacturer as well as the designer to be conscientious in making choices of how to design and build custom homes. By joining smart design with positive environmental choices, we can increase efficiency, promote health and reduce environmental impact. Many of these new technologies, which are now in the beginning stages of design, will be available in upcoming years.


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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie ; Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council and as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz and Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.


 
Hailey Sweet is an interior designer who holds a Visual Communications degree from FIDM and has completed training in Interior Architectural Design. She concentrates on residential design and enjoys commercial and hospitality design as well.