Friday, March 13, 2015

The Future of Kitchen Design Technology


Technology advances in luxury kitchen design promote better health, save time and reduce environmental impact. These developments in technology affect the way kitchens are being designed as well as the appliances that are selected for these designs. “Smart appliances,” which have abilities like Pandora streaming, hands-free faucets and the beginnings of virtual grocery shopping are already in existence. As these designs continue to evolve, kitchen design will become increasingly more important. This evolution of the kitchen will not only simplify everyday tasks, but also improve the way we manage health concerns and environmental responsibility. As urbanization increases, the traditional purpose of the kitchen is changing as homeowners feel they have less time to spend on conventional activities. Luxury kitchens are the first to see some of these developments in design technology.



Many advances in appliance technology are already underway. Top of the line kitchens are becoming very inventive in appearance while concerns about health have recently been at the top of the list of priorities among Americans. Kitchen design is adapting to meet consumer demand resulting in exciting changes to the way we inhabit our homes in a healthy manner. A common problem for many Americans is dehydration. Many people are actually unaware of how dehydrated they are on a daily basis, which can lead to other health problems later in life. Hydration censored faucets are in the beginning stages of design and will allow for the consumer to know how hydrated or dehydrated they are by simply placing a finger onto a censored touch screen at the top of the faucet. Censors that interpret dehydration will also be able to test vitamin levels of the body in the same way. 


Kitchens of the future will incorporate a new technology that works as a medical dispenser, reading vitals and dispensing the necessary vitamins and nutrients accordingly. With a similar type of censor, a concept product called “Nutrima” is a new technology that is intended to be able to tell you how fresh your food is and test its nutritional value. This device, which is similar to a tablet in size and design, can be installed in the kitchen. Place a food product on the sensor and nutritional value, weight, and freshness can all be measured at once.  A similar system by Whirlpool will also have social capabilities so the freshness and nutritional value of the food may be shared to other consumers. As homeowners become more aware and concerned with health responsibility, these concerns also seem to carry over in environmental responsibility as well.





It is no secret that our society has been ignorant to the negative environmental footprint we have been leaving for decades. Because of increasing concerns with sustainability, kitchen design concepts are evolving to better support sustainable ideals. “Working kitchen,” is a term that has formerly been used to refer to a kitchen layout that places appliances in a way that allows the consumer to accomplish tasks in the kitchen most efficiently, usually referring to the placement of the refrigerator, stove and sink. This term is now being redefined as we become a society with less time to do laborious chores. “Working kitchens” of the future will soon be understood as kitchens that have the energy of one appliance recycled to produce energy for another. For example, a refrigerator that runs nonstop throughout the day and night can create the energy needed to heat the water for a dishwasher. 


This imagined kitchen would soon become a reality as concept designs become tangible. In addition to recycling energy, it is also possible to recycle water in a similar manner. A new type of disposal design by GE Appliances is currently in its beginning stages and incorporates a sink that recycles waste water and redirects this water to a home garden. The same sink will also be capable of turning food waste into compost pellets, which can then be used to fertilize a home garden. Another strategy for reusing water use incorporates an in-sink dishwasher; smaller loads of dishes will be washed in minutes, using less water and less energy than traditional dishwashers. From a design perspective, combining many of these useful technologies conserves resources while maintaining a luxurious and minimalist aesthetic.





As appliances change and evolve, the overall aesthetic look of kitchens will change also. Sleeker designs made with environmentally responsible materials are becoming increasingly popular. The environmental impact of these materials is being investigated more than ever before. Paperstone is one example of a material such as this. By fusing together recycled paper, the matter becomes dense and heat resistant. This material may potentially be used for counter tops, appliances, walls and even furniture. Icestone, which also uses recycled materials, is a synthetic mixture of concrete and recycled glass, creating a decorative yet environmentally friendly design option. Cork and rubber are also becoming increasingly prevalent materials used to kitchen design and are sophisticated as well as practical. These progressive materials are being paired with new technology and smart design strategies to create kitchen spaces that are not only visually appealing but also functional and responsible.

Good interior design is never only about the visual appearance of the space. It has become the responsibility of the manufacturer as well as the designer to be conscientious in making choices of how to design and build custom homes. By joining smart design with positive environmental choices, we can increase efficiency, promote health and reduce environmental impact. Many of these new technologies, which are now in the beginning stages of design, will be available in upcoming years.


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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie ; Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council and as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz and Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.


 
Hailey Sweet is an interior designer who holds a Visual Communications degree from FIDM and has completed training in Interior Architectural Design. She concentrates on residential design and enjoys commercial and hospitality design as well. 



Tuesday, March 10, 2015

How to Display Collections Without Looking like a Hoarder


Turn it into wall art
Whether it's vintage maps or screen-printed concert posters or favorite Playbills, frame and hang them together to create a gallery wall, like in this room designed by Michel Botbol.



Ditch the shelves
Instead of hiding away a beautiful book collection on a shelf, put it to work on your vanity. The varying levels, seen on this vanity designed by Emily Current and Maritt Elliot, will keep the space from looking too cluttered, and you can start the day looking at your favorite novels.




Know when to go all out...
A grouping of like objects in one space is dramatic, but a grouping of like objects everywhere can look demented. Concentrate your collection in one area for the biggest impact, like in this home owned by Chrisine and Craig Gillespie.




...And when to practice restraint
You don't need to show off every item in your collection to make a statement. Try clustering a few well-chosen objects on a coffee table or vanity, like this set of glass strikers in interior designer Sara Story's home.




Don't be too precious
Instead of tucking your collections away behind the glass walls of a curio cabinet, group several pieces with other items of a set of shelves, as seen in this home designed by Mark Zeff.





Choose unexpected places
Displaying collections in an atypical spot makes a greater impact, like this set of shells on (and in) a fireplace in decorator Elaine Griffin's home.




Make a scene
Not everything looks best arranged side-by-side on a shelf. For more playful items, like this collection of white porcelain creatures, try placing them in different directions, like they're interacting with each other, as seen in John Roselli's home.




Let individual pieces shine
Try highlighting each item by giving it its own section of a bookcase, as seen in Julianna Moore's home designed by Oliver Freundlich. 


*Originally posted on ElleDecor.com





SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on theSanta Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.



Friday, March 6, 2015

Bold Dining Rooms That Will Make You Want To Throw A Dinner Party


Statement-Making Wall Art
A mix of strong colors and styles (Louis XV-style chairs from a Paris flea market surround an IKEA table) create casual elegance in a Harlem, New York dining area.




Sleek Styling
The dining room in Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner's Manhattan apartment features a Lindsey Adelman light fixture, a custom-made table, and Mies van der Rohe chairs.




Wallpaper and Rug with Opposing Patterns
The patterns of the custom wallpaper and rug create dramatic tension in Jean-Louis Denoit's dining room.



Hand-Painted Wallpaper
Hand-painted 1920's-style wallpaper by Fromental depicting sparrows parched in a gnarled cherry contrast with the masculine furnishings in fashion designer Adam Lippe's home.




Candy Colors
The walls of writer Amy Fine Collin's dining room were painted with lilac, gold, and pale-blue stripes by artist Robert Hoven and the graphic candy-color carpet is by Gene Meyer for M&M Design International.





Stunning Furniture
The George Nakashima chairs in this dining room designed by Joe D'urso prove that sometimes the strongest statements are in the details.





Eclectic Combinations
A leather banquette with trapunto embroidery by Penn & Fletcher is mixed with antique table and chairs, photographs by Vik Muniz, a rug by Stark Carpet is a Manhattan dining room.




Lacquered Walls
To attain this high-shine effect, the walls of Jackie Astier's Manhattan apartment were painted with 10 coats of custom lacquer.




Mis of Old and New
Antique furniture and art are paired with modern photography and area rugs in textile designer Susan Hable Smith's Victorian cottage.




Designed by Robert Couturier highlights the designer



*Originally posted on ElleDecor.com


SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on theSanta Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.



Monday, March 2, 2015

Statement-Making Headboards


Tufted
This bed with a tufted headboard in a neutral fabric and a classic shape was designed by Thom Filicia.






Glamorous Shape
A stunning shape paired with a subdued fabric strikes an elegant balance in an Upper East Side apartment designed by Katie Ridder and Peter Pennoyer.





Bold Pattern
This custom headboard is upholstered in Schumacher fabrics in a bedroom designed by Alessandra Branca.





Striped Textiles
This dramatic headboard Frank Webb designed for his Dutchess County, New York, home is paired with neutral bedding and accessories.





Subtle Pattern
The custom headboard in designer Caroline Cummings Raferty's Manhattan home is upholstered in a Rogers and Goffigon linen.



Dramatic Design
In the master bedroom of Jackie Astier's Manhattan apartment, the custom-made headboard is upholstered in an Osborne & Little velvet.






Inspired By India
John Robshaw's Kerala headboard cuts a striking figure.





Dreamy Fabric
A custom tufted headboard in a creamy neutral fabric punctuates the master bedroom in Alidad's London apartment.




Leather
The custom-made bed in this California cottage features a leather headboard.




Mirrors





Doors
Antique bordello doors serve as a headboard in this master bedroom designed by Darryl Carter.


*Original article posted on ElleDecor.com


Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Redondo Beach Kitchen + Great Room Remodel

 
Click any image to enlarge.
 
 



 


 





 
 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.

Monday, January 26, 2015

Perfect Kitchens for Entertaining



Country breakfasts are served in the Thom Filicia–designed Adirondack vacation home of a California couple. The kitchen’s barstools are by Marsia Holzer Studio, and the wing chair at right is from Lillian August.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn



Leather-clad armchairs surround a Federal drop-leaf breakfast table in the kitchen—a former conservatory—of a historic upstate New York getaway.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn



A. Rudin chairs line up along one end of the island in the Nashville kitchen of philanthropists Jennifer and Billy Frist. The McAlpine Booth & Ferrier Interiors–designed home includes a pool area and an open-air lounge off the kitchen and family dining space.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


Stools by DM/DM line up in fashion designer Jenni Kayne’s bright Beverly Hills kitchen. The space also features a full-height wine cooler and vintage French pendant fixtures that hang from the reclaimed-wood ceiling.
Photo: Roger Davies



Barstools by decorator Francis Sultana furnish the garden-level kitchen of a 19th-century London triplex updated by Sultana.
Photo: Luke White



The second kitchen of a lakeside upstate New York residence, decorated by McAlpine Booth & Ferrier Interiors, is outfitted with lanterns by Baker and Dessin Fournir stools upholstered in Edelman leather.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn



Stools by BassamFellows provide a perch at the kitchen counter of Will Ferrell’s New York City loft. In the adjacent dining area, Tejo Remy light fixtures preside over a vintage Paul T. Frankl dining table and Eames chairs. The artworks are by (from left) Donald Sultan and Roy Lichtenstein.
Photo: William Waldron


John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s spacious Hollywood Hills, California, kitchen features rift-cut teak cabinetry and a trio of stools by Emmerson Troop. Don Stewart of Desiderata Design reconfigured the 1960s home to maximize its central living/dining/kitchen space.
Photo: Roger Davies


Interior designer Sara Story’s handsome Texas Hill Country kitchen is furnished with custom Wyeth stools.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn



The vintage barstools in a Houston ch√Ęteau’s kitchen were found at a Paris flea market. The counters are made from reclaimed 18th-century stone, and the dishes are by Vietri.
Photo: Eric Pasiecki


In Houston, designer Miles Redd gave a modern subway-tile-sheathed white kitchen pops of color with bright counter stools.
Photo: Thomas Loof



Aluminum pendant lamps from the 1930s hang above the marble-topped island in a Long Island kitchen designed by Steven Gambrel. A Beaux Arts–style clock presides over the space, which has seating from the Sundance Catalog.
Photo: Oberto Gil



A bold rattan Campana Brothers light hangs in a Connecticut kitchen designed by India Mahdavi. The owners’ golden retriever lounges in front of a trio of BassamFellows stools. The space features custom lacquer cabinetry inspired by decorative concrete blocks from the 1960s.
Photo: Jason Schmidt



Vintage milk-glass pendants hang over the island of a spacious Beverly Hills kitchen, which is painted a shade of Farrow & Ball blue. 


Bistro-style barstools by TK Collections provide comfortable seating in the kitchen of a 1920s oceanfront Palm Beach mansion renovated by David Easton.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


Jewelry designer Ippolita Rostagno’s kitchen, on the parlor floor of her four-story Park Slope, Brooklyn, brownstone, is furnished with BassamFellows stools and cowhide-clad Ligne Roset dining chairs. The photograph (of Tammy Faye Messner) is by Martin Schoeller.
Photo: Richard Powers



*This article was originally posted on www.ArchitecturalDigest.com





 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie and Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on theSanta Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz and Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.