Tuesday, April 15, 2014

DIY or Designer?



Many people are not entirely satisfied with their home d├ęcor, and are faced with two options when it comes to remodeling their space. If you have a clear idea of what you want from your space, functionally and aesthetically, a strong initial impulse may be to do it yourself. If you have a great deal of time and patience and want the experience and satisfaction of designing and transforming your own space, this impulse may be justified. However, it is easy to underestimate and overlook many elements of the design process, and the initial excitement can evaporate when faced with the headache of unanticipated problems. Even with a clear vision of your desired space, locating the pieces you need can be a complicated affair. An interior designer draws upon a network of connections and resources to expedite and facilitate the acquisition of the pieces you need. Without an understanding of the practical half of design, even an apparently simple remodel can consume a remarkable amount of time and energy if not facilitated properly.



If, on the other hand, you elect to approach the design process more casually, transforming a space piecemeal as you encounter pieces you like, working with an interior designer can be just as useful. This approach can be satisfying, but without a clear sense of the needs of the space, can also lead to costly errors or an interminable project. Without a structure to the process, an expensive piece purchased early in the remodel process might no longer seem appropriate in light of new acquisitions. You might also find that, because of the lack of an initial plan, your space may end up looking too crowded or too spare as the project draws to a close. At the end of a long and difficult process, dissatisfaction is the last thing you want.




An initial investment in an interior designer ensures avoidance of these problems. An interior designer will communicate with you to get a clear sense of both the function of the space and how you would like it to look and feel. They will then draw upon a depth of experience to clarify your vision of the space and orchestrate the remodeling process. The designer does not exclude you from this process; communication at every stage of the process ensures that you are able to the enjoy the experience of making design decisions without the anxiety and complexity of hunting down an securing the pieces and services necessary fro the transformation of the space. You will experience the satisfaction of the design process while avoiding the many pitfalls that the “do it yourself” designer risks.
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 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.
Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projects, commercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more!

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Events with the Santa Monica Conservancy!

We are excited to share some fantastic upcoming events at the Annenberg Community Beach House! 


Join the weekend festivities April 26-27th as we celebrate the Beach House's 5th Anniversary. Both Saturday and Sunday are filled with a wide variety of free, family-friendly events and activities. Start the day with yoga on the beach with instructor Brad Keimach, or with a $15 reservation learn to paddleboard. Throughout the afternoon, visitors can enjoy beach games and activities from tug of war to sack races. Should you want to take the educational route, both site and self-guided tours will be available with Beach House architects and Santa Monica Conservancy Docents.


Please note that parking is extremely limited, and visitors are highly encouraged to walk or bike to the Beach House if possible. Read more about the event here!



In cooperation with the L.A. Heritage Alliance, the Santa Monica Conservancy is thrilled to announce this year's annual L.A. Heritage Day event! This will be held Sunday, April 27th in Pico House at El Pueblo Historical Monument, known for being the birthplace of Los Angeles and home to the famous Olvera Street. Visitors will enjoy a full schedule of speakers, children's activities, and booths for over 70 organizations dedicated to preserving history and heritage. For more information on the event, download the flyer from the Los Angeles Heritage website here.

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 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.
Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projects, commercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more!

Thursday, March 27, 2014

The Shotgun House Returns Home to Ocean Park!


Thanks to months of hard work, dedication, tremendous community involvement, and the tireless efforts of the Santa Monica Conservancy, the Shotgun House is finally returning home to Ocean Park! This Saturday, March 29th, starting at approximately 8 am, this historic 1890s shotgun house will make its way to a new permanent location across from the Ocean Park Library on Second Street. We are thrilled to invite you all to witness the event as the house is towed on a flatbed via the route featured below.



Capitalizing on this unique educational opportunity, the Santa Monica Conservancy has created an activity guide for local schoolchildren. The guide covers the history of the house, the process of moving buildings, and the importance of site preservation. To read or download the activity guide click here: House on the Move Guide

The shotgun house almost met its destruction fourteen years ago, but with the help of the community, the Ocean Park Community Organization and the Santa Monica Conservancy, a plan was put into place to save the house as a designated landmark. In its new location, adjacent to a cluster of other historic buildings, the shotgun house is slated to become the Conservancy's Preservation Resource Center. This new center will serve the community in offering information on the city's history and practical resources for building preservation.

To learn more about the shotgun house, site preservation, and the Conservancy, be sure to visit their website at: http://www.smconservancy.org/

(All images belong to the Santa Monica Conservancy.)

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Docent Volunteer Opportunity at the Annenberg Community Beach House


We are excited to share the Santa Monica Conservancy’s amazing docent volunteer opportunity with the Annenberg Community Beach House! This fascinating site has a history which weaves together classic Hollywood of the 1920s with contemporary green building standards and everything in between. Since its opening in 2009, enthusiastic and dedicated volunteers have fueled efforts to preserve local history and engage the community

If you are interested in becoming a part of this dynamic team, applications can be found here and should be emailed to info@smconservancy.org by Saturday, March 29th

New docent volunteers are required to attend a series of three afternoon lectures from 2-4pm on April 5th,12th, and 19th. The required time commitment is six hours per month, in two shifts of three hours each. No prior docent experience is required, and onsite training follows the lectures.



The trio of lectures, titled “The People and History of the Beach House,” is open to the public at $25 for the series or $10 for individual days. They will be held at the Ken Edwards Center, 1527 4th St in downtown Santa Monica. Saturday, April 5th will feature writer Cari Beauchamp and historian Mark Wanamaker on the glamorous Hollywood history of the Beach House. April 12th will be led by Preservation consultant Christy McAvoy and John Berley of Frederick Fisher Partners Architects on the site's transformations. Finally, April 19th will feature film historian Elaina Archer as she presents her documentary on Marion Davies, followed by a discussion with docent Kay Pattison. Tickets can be purchased here.


For more information on the Annenberg Community Beach House, be sure to visit their website at http://www.annenbergbeachhouse.com/.

(All images in this post belong to the Annenberg Community Beach House.)

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 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.


Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projects, commercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more!

Monday, March 24, 2014

Life Rolls On



Design and fabricate a fantastic new office space that melds form and function with strict accessibility requirements and virtually no budget? Challenge accepted! In Icon Magazine's article “Roll With It,” Sarah details her involvement in an ambitious pro-bono design project benefiting the non-profit organization Life Rolls On, which helps individuals with spinal cord injuries see possibility beyond paralysis.





The article explains that the LRO organization was founded in 2002 by a competitive surfer who was paralyzed in a surfing accident. When their headquarters upgraded from a cramped office to one nearly double the size, they realized they needed a designer to help fill that extra space! Enter Sarah Barnard Design, a participant in The 1% programs which connects non-profits with designers willing to donate their services.





Donating an estimated 200 hours of time, the four-person firm rallied individuals and companies in the local community to donate money, time, and resources. Keeping in mind Sarah's commitment to sustainability in design, nothing went to waste! From re-purposed skateboard decks to “surprise” furniture donations, this space not only utilizes all creative opportunities, but thoughtfully incorporates design elements into a cohesive design that reflects the organization itself.





Be sure to read the full article in Icon Magazine for even more insight on this exciting project! To learn more about Life Rolls On, visit their website at www.liferollson.org. For more information about The 1% program, visit www.theonepercent.org.

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 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.



Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projectscommercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more!

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

The Shotgun House is Coming to Its New Home!





City Permit Specialist Linnea Henandez hands the building permit to Juan Padilla of the Minardos Group, Conservancy Architect Mario Fonda-Bonardi and Board President Carol Lemlein
Have you sees the construction fence in the parking lot across from the Ocean Park Library? 
We have a building permit! The permit was the final step in the approval process for the rehabilitation of the Shotgun House as the Preservation Resource Center.

Moving Day

The actual date has not yet been set, but as soon as it is, you will be invited to witness the house move on a flatbed truck from 14th and Colorado to the final destination at 2nd Street and Norman Place. We’ll tell you just as soon as we know!

The Preservation Resource Center

Fourteen years ago a largely unaltered 1890s shotgun house was nearly demolished and with it an important part of Santa Monica history. Due to the combined efforts of concerned residents, the former Ocean Park Community Organization (OPCO), the Santa Monica Conservancy, and the City of Santa Monica, the house was saved and designated a landmark. Now, after more than a decade in storage, the house will move to its permanent site on Second Street across from the Ocean Park Library where it will soon become the Conservancy’s Preservation Resource Center. It will take its place among a cluster of other historic buildings, including the California Heritage Museum, Merle Norman Cosmetics office, the Carnegie branch library, and the Third Street Neighborhood Historic District.


The transformation of the Shotgun House into a Preservation Resource Center is supported by a $1.6 million fundraising campaign that includes hiring the Conservancy’s first executive director and expanding programming and community education. The Resource Center will be a clearinghouse for practical, user-friendly information about historic resources in Santa Monica and the methods and benefits of preserving older buildings while serving as a model for how even the simplest older structure can serve contemporary needs.

Have you made a donation? 
Your gift – of any amount – will help make the Preservation Resource Center a success, educating the community about the why, the how, and the benefits of historic preservation!

Those Who Have Helped Us Get This Far

Major funding partners of the project have included (in kind contributions in italics) the Ahmanson Foundation, The City of Santa Monica, Fonda-Bonardi and Hohman Architects, Friends of Heritage Preservation, Harding Larmore Kutcher and Kozal, The Minardos Group, The National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation, as well as current and past board members of the Santa Monica Conservancy and many other generous businesses and individuals who will be recognized at the grand opening of the Preservation Resource Center.

Thank you all for your support! 


Shotgun Houses along the beach in Ocean Park
About the Shotgun House

The first shotgun houses in Santa Monica were built as vacation rentals, a more comfortable alternative than camping in tents or staying in more expensive hotel rooms. Eventually they became permanent residences. In Ocean Park’s first phase of development, shotgun houses were built on the site or brought in by rail. This shotgun house was originally located just two blocks from the Santa Fe railroad depot and within easy reach of the area’s tourist attractions. Because many shotgun houses were flimsily built, many did not stand up well to the passage of time. By the mid-twentieth century a number of them were deemed unsafe and bulldozed. Many others were destroyed due to development pressure over the last century. Yet, against all odds, this house persisted, and was occupied as a residence until 1996.

Historians debate the origins of the name “shotgun.” Some believe the word is a version of the Yoruba (African) word for house—“togun.” Others cite the simple floor plan of these dwellings. Shotgun houses are typically one room wide and two or three rooms deep. Lacking a hallway, the rooms are aligned with connecting doorways so that a shotgun’s bullet fired through the front door would exit cleanly through the back door.


Friday, February 21, 2014

Care Facilities Designed to Improve Quality of Life


Text by: Rebeca Huerta      Images Courtesy of: Cynthia Soto, Fritzi Martinez, Rebeca Huerta.

 
When we think of long-term care facilities, the first thing that might come to mind is boring white rooms with a television as the only source of entertainment and nurses constantly compromising the resident’s privacy.  Long-term care facilities are being dramatically enhanced with design strategies that can improve occupant’s health, happiness and personal satisfaction.

Residents of poorly designed facilities may get depressed due to isolation and/or lack of interesting activities. The floor plan layout of the care facility can negatively affect the residents if it lacks the necessary design strategies to encourage community and entertainment. Theaters, dance studios and gyms are being included in the spaces to keep the residents stimulated. Technology is a big part of modern life. Facilities designers are aware of these technical advances and are including them into the space. For example designers plan a wireless internet connection in every room and additional wall plugs to keep the residents in communication with their loved ones. Some benefits of a well-designed layout can include more person contact and even a longer life.



 
(Click above image to enlarge)
 


The feeling of being in a luxurious hotel is pleasing and designers are working to provide the same level of independence and privacy into the resident’s suites. The suites are designed to look like luxury apartments. They accommodate the needs of the residents by providing amenities that increase safety like wall mounted grab bars, therapeutic beds and chairs that are easy to get up from. Multiple amenities are included in the building layout that might also be found in a hotel, for example a spa, dining areas and emergency store. Personal preferences are taken into consideration by providing rooms that can be decorated to fit the tenant’s lifestyle. This benefits the residents because it offers comfort and independence.






 
Vintage Senior Living is an excellent example of a care facility that applies a number of progressive design principals. Common areas include a theater, library, and multiple activity rooms. To keep the residents happy and entertained they offer cooking classes, exercise classes and guests speakers.

The theater room is designed to look like a traditional public theater. After visiting, the concessions visitors enter an enclosed room that provides comfortable, soft seats that make them want to cuddle up and enjoy the movie. Designed to accommodate wheelchairs in every row, this theatre makes “going out” possible for everyone at home.


 
The library is designed as a retreat. An array of seating types allows for guest to choose the type of seating that best suits them. The book shelves are lowered to provide easy access for persons using wheelchairs. Additional book shelves are designed underneath the seats to provide more shelving space and to reduce the need for getting in and out of their seats. Complimentary computers are also provided for residents use.

Activity rooms are designed to provide one organized group activity per day. Storage is designed to accommodate all art supplies and project materials. Providing a dedicated space for stimulating activities is an important part of the interior design plan.




 
The most important strategy employed by designers is the hospitality approach which provides independent living and privacy. Long-term care facilities are not the sad, poorly decorated places that most of us fear. Contemporary buildings offer residents the desirable attributes of a proper home: privacy, comfort and luxury. The facilities are designed to be livable and provide a longer joyful life for its current and future residents.


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 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projectscommercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more! 

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Rebeca Huerta received her Bachelor of Science in Interior Design from the Art Institute-Los Angeles. She specializes in residential design but loves design in all its forms. She has received multiple awards for her AutoCAD work, hospitality design and portfolio design.

Rebeca has previously volunteered for the Los Angeles Public Library and Boys Scout of America. She enjoys music and plays piano for her church’s Sunday service. Her design inspirations come from nature and her personal explorations.

 

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Julia Morgan Day at the Beach House, Sunday March 2


Architect Julia Morgan, celebrated for her amazing career as a female trailblazer in a man's world, will be honored with special docent tours at the Annenberg Community Beach House on Sunday, March 2nd between 11 am and 2 pm.

Morgan received her California license to practice architecture, the first for a woman, in March 1904. With training in civil engineering and an architectural degree from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, where she was the first female student, she opened her own firm in San Francisco. She designed Hearst Castle for William Randolph Hearst and a Beach House in Santa Monica for Marion Davies, among more than 700 projects in a career spanning over 40 years.


Morgan had a close relationship with patron Hearst as well as with his mother, the formidable Phoebe Apperson Hearst. These themes and other aspects of her life and work will be explored by docents at the Marion Davies Guest House on Julia Morgan Day.

This year The AIA awarded its highest honor, a Gold Medal, to Julia Morgan, the first time that a woman received this prize - and another "first" for her. Accolades poured in, including from Senator Diane Feinstein who said, "Julia Morgan is unquestionably among the greatest American architects of all time and a true California gem."

Tours at the Annenberg Community Beach House, located at 415 Pacific Coast Highway, are free and no reservations are required. Parking is available for a fee. The Santa Monica Conservancy partners with the City of Santa Monica to present docent tours of the Beach House throughout the year.

For more information about the Beach House, click here.


Are you a current member of the Conservancy?
Your annual membership contributions support our work to preserve the architectural and cultural heritage of our city. You will receive our informative quarterly newsletter and discounts on tours and events - as well as complimentary admission to Saturday's annual Holiday Party.

Join or renew now! You may join online as an Individual or Household Member or as a Business/Corporate MemberOr send a check to the address below.

Thank you for your support!
Questions? Email info@smconservancy.org or leave a message at 310-496-3146.


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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projectscommercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more! 

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Happy Birthday Marion!

Happy New Year, everyone!

It's party time at the Annenberg Community Beach House, in honor of Marion Davies' birthday, co-sponsored by the City of Santa Monica and the Santa Monica Conservancy.

The celebration is Sunday, January 12, 2014, from 11 am - 2 pm. Many of Marion's famous friends and family members will be on hand to share their stories and memories of her....you may encounter Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Marlene Dietrich, and WR Hearst, among others. Docents will be attired in period dress, and guests are encouraged to do the same.

Guest house tours are from 11 - 1, followed by naughty and nice tunes of the 20s and 30s performed by Janet Klein and John Reynolds. Refreshments and a toast to Marion at 1:30. Rare photos from a private collection and a rediscovered oil painting of Marion will be displayed.

The Bachelor Father (1931), a film starring Marion which displays her appealing personality, will be shown beginning at 11:15 am in the Event House.

The event is free but reservations are required as space is limited. Click here to make reservations on the Beach House ticket site, and here for directions and parking information.

We appreciate the support of Fred Deni of Back on the Beach Cafe, and Vanilla Bake Shop at 5th and Wilshire for their refreshment donations.

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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projectscommercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more! 

Sunday, December 29, 2013

Artistic Space




The earliest and most obvious role for art was the decoration of spaces. This is still a common way for art to be used today. This is because our perception of a room is deeply influenced by its character and appearance. Very few of us would enjoy living and working in spaces devoid of decoration, no matter how nice the architecture. But despite the ubiquity of art in the spaces that we inhabit, we are not always aware of its presence even as we are affected by it.



Simple solutions, like hanging a picture in a room, creates an obvious point of interest. But often the design of the space is more comprehensive than we can immediately appreciate and features strategies other than simple ornamentation. The array of methods to integrate art and spaces is more diverse than a viewer likely realizes, and extends well beyond a well placed potted plant. The room as a whole can be designed such that it is a piece of art itself.


The Ocean Avenue Penthouse features artwork by Susan Hannon. In this room, a pair of hand crafted paper wings adorns the light sandy walls. They were designed to be integrated in a very specific way. Although similar in color palette, the wings emerge from the wall by their texture and the shadows that fall from their form. At a distance, this type of interruption on an otherwise smooth surface can be reminiscent of the impressionable shores of a beach, while the wing shape itself alludes to the lightness of flight and open spaces. This design approach is specific to the space, a top floor penthouse with clear views of the beach. Deeper connotations remain appropriate to the context. The wings, made of antique bible pages, allude to the story of Icarus and provide a clear parallel to the manufactured ascent afforded by the top floor in a modern building. It transforms the air in the space into a theme of the room. Even though these elements are not at once obvious, the careful coordination of artwork to a space can produce a powerful effect.



The artwork featured in the living room space of the Cosmopolitan Craftsman relates to the space more subtle ways. In the far right corner hangs a piece that is sourced directly from nature. It is a petrified fish slab, and its addition to the room acts as both an object of interest and an emphasis of the room’s color palette and cozy earthen aesthetic. Unlike the wings of the Penthouse, its presence does not directly influence the room but reinforces the design and feeling of the space. The fireplace design is a less obvious artistic piece because it also serves a functional purpose. But beneath the umbrella of interior design, all elements in a space are united to convey a single theme or effect, and all objects in the room considered to be art. Interior design exists as a combination and balance of functionality and beauty. Like a painting or sculpture, a well coordinated space can evoke from its viewer specific emotions and moods.  


















While the Ocean Avenue Penthouse and the Cosmopolitan Craftsman utilized artwork to emphasize certain elements of a space, the Landmark Bungalow dining room utilizes the space as a display for an eclectic collection of artwork. The large wooden cabinet serves as a showcase for various art pieces collected by the owner in his travels. The bust by Deborah Cansler Waters overlooks the vintage dining table. These elements were arranged to support the room's primary function as an area for people to gather, eat, and converse. The artwork provides context and stories for guests as it brings them and the space together in harmony. The vibrant blue painting on the far right by Lori Dorn compliments the effect.



It’s exciting to realize that spaces themselves can be art. Objects and spaces can serve a double purpose, at once functional, and yet organized in accordance with ideas that are artistic rather than practical. An appreciation of the work of the interior designer leads to an appreciation of the spaces we navigate on a daily basis, spaces which constitute our context and contribute to our emotional state. Understanding that the feelings we have in a room are not accidental will lead to a greater appreciation of artful interior design.

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SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on the Santa Monica Conservancy’s board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Sarah Barnard Design undertakes residential interior design projectscommercial spaces and even single rooms. She can help you with space planning, color counseling, kitchen and bath remodeling, historic preservation, and all aspects of green design and healthy living: organic, non-toxic, sustainable and fair trade materials, energy and resource conservation, air and water purification, natural furnishings and fabrics and much more!