Monday, January 26, 2015

Perfect Kitchens for Entertaining



Country breakfasts are served in the Thom Filicia–designed Adirondack vacation home of a California couple. The kitchen’s barstools are by Marsia Holzer Studio, and the wing chair at right is from Lillian August.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


Leather-clad armchairs surround a Federal drop-leaf breakfast table in the kitchen—a former conservatory—of a historic upstate New York getaway.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


A. Rudin chairs line up along one end of the island in the Nashville kitchen of philanthropists Jennifer and Billy Frist. The McAlpine Booth & Ferrier Interiors–designed home includes a pool area and an open-air lounge off the kitchen and family dining space.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


Stools by DM/DM line up in fashion designer Jenni Kayne’s bright Beverly Hills kitchen. The space also features a full-height wine cooler and vintage French pendant fixtures that hang from the reclaimed-wood ceiling.
Photo: Roger Davies


Barstools by decorator Francis Sultana furnish the garden-level kitchen of a 19th-century London triplex updated by Sultana.
Photo: Luke White


The second kitchen of a lakeside upstate New York residence, decorated by McAlpine Booth & Ferrier Interiors, is outfitted with lanterns by Baker and Dessin Fournir stools upholstered in Edelman leather.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


Stools by BassamFellows provide a perch at the kitchen counter of Will Ferrell’s New York City loft. In the adjacent dining area, Tejo Remy light fixtures preside over a vintage Paul T. Frankl dining table and Eames chairs. The artworks are by (from left) Donald Sultan and Roy Lichtenstein.
Photo: William Waldron


John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s spacious Hollywood Hills, California, kitchen features rift-cut teak cabinetry and a trio of stools by Emmerson Troop. Don Stewart of Desiderata Design reconfigured the 1960s home to maximize its central living/dining/kitchen space.
Photo: Roger Davies


Interior designer Sara Story’s handsome Texas Hill Country kitchen is furnished with custom Wyeth stools.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


The vintage barstools in a Houston château’s kitchen were found at a Paris flea market. The counters are made from reclaimed 18th-century stone, and the dishes are by Vietri.
Photo: Eric Pasiecki


In Houston, designer Miles Redd gave a modern subway-tile-sheathed white kitchen pops of color with bright counter stools.
Photo: Thomas Loof


Aluminum pendant lamps from the 1930s hang above the marble-topped island in a Long Island kitchen designed by Steven Gambrel. A Beaux Arts–style clock presides over the space, which has seating from the Sundance Catalog.
Photo: Oberto Gil


A bold rattan Campana Brothers light hangs in a Connecticut kitchen designed by India Mahdavi. The owners’ golden retriever lounges in front of a trio of BassamFellows stools. The space features custom lacquer cabinetry inspired by decorative concrete blocks from the 1960s.
Photo: Jason Schmidt


Vintage milk-glass pendants hang over the island of a spacious Beverly Hills kitchen, which is painted a shade of Farrow & Ball blue. 


Bistro-style barstools by TK Collections provide comfortable seating in the kitchen of a 1920s oceanfront Palm Beach mansion renovated by David Easton.
Photo: Pieter Estersohn


Jewelry designer Ippolita Rostagno’s kitchen, on the parlor floor of her four-story Park Slope, Brooklyn, brownstone, is furnished with BassamFellows stools and cowhide-clad Ligne Roset dining chairs. The photograph (of Tammy Faye Messner) is by Martin Schoeller.
Photo: Richard Powers



*This article was originally posted on ArchitecturalDigest.com





 SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on theSanta Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Accents of Black

Black clarifies. Place a table, seat, or artwork lacquered dark as ebony in a room awash in neutral tones and watch the darkness snap to attention. It adds a crisp and bold touch to the room. Add an ornamental grass with obsidian-tone leaves to a pastel garden and the same thing happens—that smokiness allures the eye into looking closer while making the surrounding seem even more brilliantly tinted. Think of how a classic little black dress stands out amid a crowd gowned in fondant froth. Black—the absence of color, the consumer of light—seasons our polychrome world with a note of mystery.



The black frames above the mantle balance the warm colors in the room.

The mirror above this bed fills the empty white wall with its modern design.

The taupe legs on these ottomans neutralize the bright neutral fabrics 
in this living room.


These coffee table legs juxtapose the neutral carpet and furniture.




There can be multiple accents of black as shown above. The black backsplash tile,
drapery over the sink, and black stool compose a luxurious, modern kitchen. 

The warm grey sofa pops due to the black outlining of the room and elements within.



The black countertops create a stark comparison between the green tiles
and white cabinetry to accentuate the brightness of this kitchen.

To add a subtle touch of black, you can incorporate artworks such as this
painting or a piece of furniture with a black build. 

In this beachfront getaway, this black customized tv is paired with a black throw 
and starfish to give the room a more cohesive look.

This bedroom was designed with a black bed frame, night stand, and drawer
to enhance the intimate environment.

The light cabinetry juxtaposes the black and turquoise countertops 
offering a modern design.


SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on theSanta Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.

Monday, January 5, 2015

Come Celebrate Marion Lane's Birthday!

Happy Birthday Marion!

Sunday, January 11, 11am – 2pm
Annenberg Community Beach House, 415 Pacific Coast Hwy Santa Monica, CA 90402

The Hollywood crowd of film stars from the Golden Age invites you to a party at the Annenberg Community Beach House to celebrate Marion Davies’ birthday. Come and join the fun! It’s free and will be a swell good time. The date isSunday January 11, from 11am – 2pm, and includes musical entertainment and refreshments. Charlie Chaplin will be at the front door of the Guest House to greet party guests, and you”ll encounter Constance and Norma Talmadge, Marie Dressler, Joan Crawford, and even that sensational columnist Hedda Hopper. Make your reservation here.

Presented by the Docent Council of the Annenberg Community Beach House, docents in vintage costumes will share interesting stories of Marion Davies’ life and times. Don your hats and feather boas, or come as you are, to celebrate her talents and versatility. Watch her perform in her acclaimed film, “Show People,” introduced by documentary filmmaker Elaina Archer. Musical entertainment features Janet Klein and her Parlor Boys, interpreting period songs with wit and charm; she will dazzle you with tunes from old-time jazz, ragtime, and novelty songs. Other special guests are Lara Fowler, writer/historian now engaged in researching a much-needed biography of Marion Davies; and Michael Yakaitis, Hollywood historian and photograph collector.

The Santa Monica Conservancy partners with the City of Santa Monica in providing docent-guided tours of the Annenberg Community Beach House. For visiting hours and open days, check the Beach House website.

Friday, December 19, 2014

Tips on Decorating A Bedroom

1. A Comfortable Rug
Nothing ruins a morning like stepping onto a cold, hard floor.Do yourself a favor and make sure your first step into the day is cushy and comforting. Already have carpet in the bedroom but it’s not enough? Consider layering a smaller rug by the bed, a similar idea to what’s seen here in a room by Adeeni Design Group.



































2. A Theme
The first thing a child will consider when putting together their first bedroom is a theme. Adults tend to shy away from a decorative theme when envisioning their bedroom. But even when it’s not Spiderman or Princess-powered, a theme can is a unifying device. This Southhampton cottage bedroom designed by Timothy Whealon includes stripes used throughout to create a streamlined yet funky touch. Notice how they’re not all the same width, color, or even direction.



































3. The Right Amount of Throws and Pillows
There should be enough pillows so that your bed looks sumptuous and welcoming when made, yet not enough that getting in bed requires 10 minutes of excavating. The sweet spot is usually between 1-6, depending on the size of your bed. The shown example is from designer Lindsey Coral Harper.



































4. A Place to Sit
This room designed by Robert Passal has more than a couple seats. A good spot to sit down will serve you well when reading something you can’t afford to fall asleep during, or need to have a conversation with your partner not in bed. It’s also great for putting on shoes, or for not working on your bed.



































5. No Tech!
Technology will keep you up later than necessary and consequently keep your minding churning longer before you can drift off to sleepIt’s hard, especially in an increasingly-connected world, but if you leave your phones and emails at the door you’ll be happier. There will be more room for furniture and accessories you love for their own sake: not how they keep you tied to the online world! This bedroom is designed by Aurélien Gallet.



















6. Collections
LA-based designer Kelly Sutton shows how keeping a cluster of pieces that make you smile will go a long way, especially in personalizing a bedroom. This is also a great way to incorporate pieces you’ve acquired over the years but can’t quite figure out where to put them. Make sure they’re in your line of sight upon waking up and their true purpose will be revealed.



























7. Nighstands
A nightstand with all the necessities looks lovely, but that’s not the only reason you see it so often in magazine spreads and on blogs. The combination of a cup of water, a good book, a plant or flower, and lamp (seen here in a San Francisco bedroom designed by Lisa Gutow) shows a stocked nightstand for interrupted-sleep. Don’t feel like it has to be stunning to be perfect. The more idiosyncratic and “you” it feels, the better it will accommodate your needs during the night. 
























8. The Mattress
Your bedroom wouldn’t be complete without a perfect mattress. This mattress from Saatva Matress provides great lumbar support and cool temperatures. We recommend choosing a mattress and foundation-height based not just on your bed frame and headboard, but also the height of your night tables and window sills. A low-profile headboard may call for an 11.5-inch model, while higher window sills make sense with something higher-up, like a 14.5-inch.
Look at objective measures of comparison when making the call: What type of steel is used? What type of foam? Are the coils individually-wrapped, making the bed responsive to your body?



























9. Photographs, but not of family
You should have as many family photos as you wish in other rooms in the house, but it's best to keep the bedroom's artwork less emotionally loaded. Elegant and calming photographs in this room by designer Ryan White evoke good feelings much like family snaps do, without reminding you of specific people while you're trying to fall asleep.



























10. DRAMA!
Even the brightest, most cheerful bedrooms need an element of dark, sexy glamour. This bedroom by Windsor Decorating Design has multiple. The moody wall paint, the theatrical chandelier, even an oversized gray headboard conveys an elegant and sultry atmosphere. Notice how clean lines and touches of white keep it from looking like a bordello. Balance is key. Stick with one or two pieces.

*This article was originally posted on www.elledecor.com

SARAH BARNARD is a member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), is certified by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), and is recognized by the International Institute for Bau-Biologie & Ecology as a Building Biology Practitioner (BBP) and by the United States Green Building Council as a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). She has served on theSanta Monica Conservancy's board of directors and specializes in green interior design and historic preservation.

Undertaking a broad range of projects, all of which are grounded in smart design and mindful of healthy living, Sarah’s diverse body of work includes upscale private residences, chic restaurants, luxurious spas and impressive corporate headquarters. Her projects have been featured in local and national publications, and have placed prominently in several noted design competitions. Her design practice is the culmination of education and interests in art, architecture, textiles and the environment and she has written several articles for important publications including the USGBC, United States Green Building Council.

Barnard is currently working on commissions of private residences in the Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, Los Feliz & Palos Verdes Estates. Other recent projects include the corporate offices of National Geographic Entertainment in Beverly Hills, the headquarters of Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher Reeve Foundation in Culver City, a Backstage Celebrity Eco-Lounge for both the Academy of Country Music Awards and the Teen Choice Awards and a Sustainable Penthouse on Ocean Avenue for an out of town couple with super meditative space requirements. Think total relaxation and harmony with the universe.